Workshops

Here are the confirmed workshops so far! Check back in as we add more workshops and descriptions.

Learning from Sparrows Point: What 126 Years of Steelmaking in Baltimore Taught Us About the High Cost of Economic Development – presented by Deborah Rudacille

Fossil Fuel Exports: The Global View – From the Great Barrier Reef to First Nations territory in Alberta, from Indonesian rainforests to the Caspian Sea, the growth and importance fossil fuel exports has had massive repercussions on the safety and health of communities and ecosystems across the world. In this workshop, we’ll learn about key battlegrounds and follow the money trail to the World Bank, the US Import Export Bank, and corporate financial institutions.

Energy Poverty, Cove Point, and the Export Economy – Energy poverty is one of the most important environmental justice challenges that we currently face, yet its causes and consequences are often overlooked by the US climate justice movement. We will introduce a working definition of energy poverty, explore its connection to fossil fuel consumption, and learn from examples of communities fighting back around the world. We will then examine how Cove Point, Cheniere, and other LNG export terminals will drive up the cost of energy at the expense of the health and economic security of Maryland’s most disadvantaged citizens.

The Dirty Energy Road Show – examines the parallels of coal and nuclear issues, and connects them to other forms of dirty energy and climate change. Parallels are drawn to hydraulic fracturing for natural gas as well. The presentation looks at the mining of materials, how the power plants work, waste issues, and impacts on the health of humans and ecosystems. It also shows examples of front line communities fighting back against waste dumps and other polluting facilities, as well as Mountain Justice folks fighting mountaintop removal.

Natural Gas Infrastructure – Pipelines. Compressor stations. Storage facilities. All of these are essential parts of the  rapidly expanding natural gas infrastructure in the United States. And all of them are disruptive, dirty, and dangerous. Learn about this increasingly crucial issue and hear how communities large and small are breaking new ground in fights to protect themselves from these harmful projects when laws, regulations, and government agencies won’t.

Paperwrenching 101 – This is a general overview of paper wrenching tactics and tricks of the trade for people who are not working in staffed nonprofits. Use bureaucracy and the court system to defeat land use and development projects large and small. The photo-ops aren’t as exciting as in-the-field direct action, but the results can be tremendous, and you can do lots of it without even getting out of bed!

Paperwrenching 201 – This is a case study on how The AMP Creeks Council is using paper wrenching to fight Cove Point. We’ll take you from the point where we jumped into the fight through filings, hearings, and court dates. Looking to the future, we’ll also talk about ways that you can get involved, or take lessons we’ve learned and apply them to Cove Point or other projects yourself.

Identifying Fracking Equipment – Learn how to differentiate between different pieces of industrial equipment. What they do, how they work, some of the hazards, and where they fit into the fracking timeline.

An Activist’s Primer on Corporate Finance – What makes a corporation a corporation? Where does the money come from? What kind of information does it have to provide to the public? How can you find that and more? We’ll answer these questions and discuss ways to use the results to choose campaign targets, craft messages, and cut through the rhetoric around the role of corporations in the United States and around the world.

Family Activism – A mother and son activist duo will talk about how activism can be a family endeavor. We’ll share our experiences and ideas for parents and kids about how to make activism safe, fun, accessible, and effective for families.

Confronting Ableism – The ableist worldview defines certain bodily characteristics as “normal.” It expects people whose bodies don’t fit these norms to try to hide their differences or themselves. We will discuss these definitions and expectations and the various ways they interact with environmental and economic exploitation. Then we will consider how we can address ableism within our communities in ways that will enhance our work.

History of the Global Climate Justice Movement – From Bali to Cochabamba, from Jemez to Copenhagen, we will trace the history of the global climate justice movement, articulated through decades of struggle and hard work from grassroots, indigenous, and poor peoples’ organizations in the Global South. We will compare the established goals and principles of the global climate justice movement, identifying those that have been lost in translation in the emerging, youth-led climate justice movement in the US. Finally, we will have a group discussion on ways that US-based activists can be better allies with frontline communities and communities of color both at home and in the Global South.

Know Your Rights – This will be lead by an experienced DC-based activist lawyer with a long history of working to protect activists, and he’s eager to share his knowledge with you!

Blockades – We will cover everything from strategically using your body and others’ to block a space to advance your campaign all the way to using more complicated gear to enhance your presence, your messaging and your ability to stay in that space longer.

History of the Global Climate Justice Movement – From Bali to Cochabamba, from Jemez to Copenhagen, we will trace the history of the global climate justice movement, articulated through decades of struggle and hard work from grassroots, indigenous, and poor peoples’ organizations in the Global South. We will compare the established goals and principles of the global climate justice movement, identifying those that have been lost in translation in the emerging, youth-led climate justice movement in the US. Finally, we will have a group discussion on ways that US-based activists can be better allies with frontline communities and communities of color both at home and in the Global South.

PLUS

Climb training
Site visits
Plant walks
Chats with local naturalists

And more!

Convinced? Register now!

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